First-Generation Seminars

First Gen - Law School

First-Generation Seminars Foster a Sense of Belonging for First-Gen Students

The UC Davis First-Generation Initiative and First-Year Seminar Program have teamed up to create First-Generation Seminars. First-Gen Seminars pair faculty and students in a small classroom environment where they can share their common experiences of being the first in their families to attend (and complete!) a university degree. The goal of these seminars is to foster a sense of belonging for first-gen students and ultimately help them complete their degrees.

First-Gen Seminars provide important opportunities for first-gen students to:

  • Share personal first-gen journeys
  • Discuss the challenges they encounter as they learn to navigate the university
  • Build upon the cultural wealth they possess to enrich our campus community
  • Be introduced to an academic topic of faculty interest in a small-seminar setting

To support you in teaching a First-Gen Seminar, the First-Gen Initiative has developed a library of resources (listed in the adjacent blue box) including scholarly articles, news articles, and videos on topics like academic engagement, retention, breaking down barriers, cultural wealth, and social support.  We are also creating videos of campus first gen faculty, and a Canvas module.

 

Our goal is to offer 25 First-Generation Seminars during our inaugural 2018-19 year—this would allow nearly 500 first-gen students to participate. 

 

If you are interested in teaching a First-Gen Seminar next year (Fall, Winter, or Spring), please contact FYS Associate Director Dr. Eddy Ruiz at ruiz@ucdavis.edu by May 1. We will then reach out to you to help you create or review your syllabus. To aid you in designing your First-Gen Seminar a sample syllabus is linked below. While you do not need to follow this example, it can give you a sense of what a First-Gen Seminar might look like. The two most important things for a First-Gen Seminar are that:

  1. You are excited about introducing students to an engaging topic worth thinking about and
  2. You are able to touch on some of the issues that first-gen students face - your own experiences and/or those of students.

Like all FYS courses, First-Gen Seminars provides you with academic enrichment funds of $3,000 for teaching 2-unit seminars and $2,500 for teaching 1-unit seminars.  You can use these funds for University related business expenses such as research or other academic or professional endeavors.  Seminar mini-grants of up to $500 can also be requested to cover eligible expenses incurred while teaching.  Seminars can be offered for either traditional letter grades or on a pass/no pass basis.